Monday 10th of August 2020

venus, cleopatra, judith, salome, susanna, herself in oils... and more beauty...

venus

Today, Google celebrates the birth of Artemisia Lomi or Artemisia Gentileschi — an Italian Baroque painter, now considered one of the most accomplished seventeenth-century artists working in the dramatic style of Caravaggio.

Born: 8 July 1593, Rome, Italy

 

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_Gentileschi

and playing the lute...

self-portrait

Self-Portrait as a Lute Player, 1615–1617


amongst the stars...

Prof. Dr. Dilhan Eryurt (29 November 1926, Izmir, 13 September 2012, Ankara) was a Turkish Astrophysicist.

She was an Astronomer who made major contributions to the Scientific research and evolution of the Sun and other stars.

From 1961–1973, Eryurt, who was the first Turkish Scientist at Middle East Technical University (METU), accepted a position at NASA and established the Astrophysics Department in the Middle East Technical University and was the Dean of the METU Science and Literature Faculty from 1988 to 1993.

...


Dr. Dilhan Eryurt's work at the Goddard Institute revealed some facts about the Sun that were not understood until then. The fact that the brightness of the Sun has not increased since its formation, 4.5 billion years ago, revealed that it was much brighter and warmer in the past. The studies were important at that time to influence the course of Scientific and Engineering research aims of new (for the time) space flights. She was awarded the Apollo Achievement Award[2] in 1969 for her successful work contributing to the achievement of the Apollo 11 mission's first landing on the moon and subsequent Lunar exploration, by providing NASA Engineers with crucial information, for modeling the Solar impact on the Lunar environment.

 

Read more:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dilhan_Eryurt

 

Dilhan Eryurt

Dilhan Eryurt

on the way to planet mars...

Sarah al-Amiri: The woman leading UAE's Mars mission

A dream was born when Sarah al-Amiri saw an image of the Andromeda Galaxy at the age of 12. In a region defined by turmoil, she never thought it would lead her country beyond Earth's stratosphere and toward Mars.

Over the past five years, the United Arab Emirates has sought to push the boundaries of science and technology.

In 2017, they announced the world's first Minister of Artificial Intelligence to spearhead the Gulf state's efforts in machine learning and other cutting-edge technologies.

That year, they also tapped a young Emirati engineer, Sarah al-Amiri, to lead the country's efforts into space at a time when the region was paying little attention to what is often described as the final frontier.

"We're a new country that is late to the competition in the global perspective," al-Amiri told the British scientific journal Nature earlier this month. "It's natural for people to think this was crazy," she added, referring to the UAE's Mars mission, set for launch next week.

 

Read more:

https://www.dw.com/en/sarah-al-amiri-the-woman-leading-uaes-mars-mission...

 

The United Arab Emirates' historic first mission to Mars is under way, after a successful lift-off in Japan.

The Hope probe launched on an H2-A rocket from Tanegashima spaceport, and is now on a 500-million-km journey to study the planet's weather and climate.

Two previous attempts to launch the probe in the past week had to be called off because of adverse weather. 

Hope's arrival in February 2021 is set to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the UAE's formation.

Her Excellency Sarah Al Amiri, the science lead on Hope, spoke of her excitement and relief in seeing the rocket climb successfully into the sky. And she stated the impact on her country would be the same as that on America when its people watched the Apollo 11 Moon landing 51 years ago, also on 20 July. 

"It was an anchor for an entire generation that stimulated everyone that watched it to push further and to dream bigger," she told BBC News.

"Today I am really glad that the children in the Emirates will wake up on the morning of the 20th of July having an anchor project of their own, having a new reality, having new possibilities, allowing them to further contribute and to create a larger impact on the world."

 

 

Read more:

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-53394737

 

 

 

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the first woman to go around the planet...

Today, Google reminds us of Jeanne Baret (sometimes spelled Baré or Barret; July 27, 1740 – August 5, 1807) — a member of Louis Antoine de Bougainville's colonial expedition on the ships La Boudeuse and Étoile in 1766–1769. Baret is recognized as the first woman to have completed a voyage of circumnavigation of the globe.[1][2]

Jeanne Baret joined the expedition disguised as a man, calling herself Jean Baret. She enlisted as valet and assistant to the expedition's naturalistPhilibert Commerçon (anglicized as Commerson), shortly before Bougainville's ships sailed from France. According to Bougainville's account, Baret was herself an expert botanist.

 

Read more:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeanne_Baret

 

baret

 

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